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Народные сказки на английском языке.

Chicken Licken

Based on a traditional folk tale
Retold by Mandy Ross

Chicken Licken is minding his chicken -pecking business one day, when an acorn drops- PLOP! On his head. "Help!" he cheeps. "The sky is falling down! I'd better go and tell the king." And off he scurries. "What's the hurry?" clucks Henny Penny.

"Oh, Henny Penny!" cheeps Chicken Licken.

"The sky is falling down! I'm off to tell the king."

"That's not funny!" clucks Henny Penny.

"I'd better come, too." And off they scurry.

"What's the hurry?" crows Cocky Locky.

"Oh, Cocky Locky!" cheeps Chicken Licken.

"The sky is falling down! We're off to tell the king."

"What a cock-a-doodle shock!" crows Cocky Locky. "I'd better come, too."

So Chicken Licken, Henny Penny and Cocky Locky scurry along to tell the king.

"What's the hurry? Quack Ducky Lucky and Drakey Lakey. "Oh, Ducky Lucky and Drakey Lakey!" cheeps Chicken Licken. "The sky is falling down! We're off to tell the king." "You look very shaky!" quacks Drakey Lakey. "We'd better come, too."

So Chicken Licken, Henny Penny, Cocky Locky, Ducky Lucky and Drakey Lakey scurry along to tell the king.

"What's the hurry?" honks Goosey Loosey.

"Oh, Goosey Loosey!" cheeps Chicken Licken. "The sky is falling down! We're off to tell the king." "Goodness gracious!" gasps Goosey Loosey. "I'd better come, too." And off they scurry. "What's the hurry?" gobbles Turkey Lurkey.

"Oh, Turkey Lurkey!" cheeps Chicken Licken. "The sky is falling down! We're off to tell the king." "I feel horribly wobbly," gobbles Turkey Lurkey. "I'd better come, too." So Chicken Licken, Henny Penny, Cocky Locky, Ducky Lucky, Drakey Lakey, Goosey Loosey and Turkey Lurkey scurry along to tell the king.

"What's the hurry?" snaps Foxy Loxy. "Oh, Foxy Loxy!" cheeps Chicken Linken.

"The sky is falling down! We're off to tell the king."

"Aha!" smiles Foxy Loxy. He has a cunning plan. " Follow me, my feathery friends," smiles Foxy Loxy. "I can help you find the king." So Chicken Licken, Henny Penny, Cocky Locky, Ducky Lucky, Drakey Lakey, Goosey Loosey and Turkey Lurkey hurry and scurry behind Foxy Loxy, all the way to the Foxy Loxy Family lair- just in time for dinner. And that was the end of Chicken Licken, Henny Penny, Cocky Locky, Ducky Lucky, Drakey Lakey, Goosey Loosey and Turkey Lurkey. And the king never did find out that the sky was falling down.


The Sly Fox and the Little Red Hen

Based on a traditional folk tale
Retold by Mandy Ross

Once there was a little red hen. She lived in a little red henhouse, safe and sound, with a little blue door and windows all around. She was a happy hen. Every day she searched for grain with a peck, peck, peck and a cluck, cluck, cluck. But then a sly young fox and his mother moved into a nearby den. The sly fox was always hungry. He licked his lips when he grain with a peck, peck, peck and a cluck, cluck, cluck. And then the sly fox tried to catch the little red hen. He plotted and planned, again and again. But the little rend hen was clever. She always got away, with a peck, peck, peck and a cluck, cluck, cluck. But then the sly fox thought up a very sly plan.

"Mother, boil some water in a pan," he said. "I'll bring home supper tonight."

Then he crept over to the little red henhouse. And he waited until at last the little red hen came out to search for grain with a peck, peck, peck and a cluck, cluck, cluck. Quick as a flash, the sly fox slipped into the henhouse. And he waited until the little red hen came hurrying home. As soon as she saw the fox, she flew up to the rafters. "You can't catch me now!" she laughed, with a peck, peck, peck and a cluck, cluck, cluck.

"All part of my plan," smiled the fox on the ground. And slowly he started to chase his tail, round and round and round and round, faster and raster…until the little red hen up in the rafters grew dizzy.

"Oh!" she clucked. "My poor head's spinning. I'm all in a tizzy." And she dropped down- plop!- straight into the fox's sack. "Ha!" laughed the fox. And then the fox slung the sack over his shoulder and set off for home with the little red hen. After a while, he stopped for a rest. The sun was warm and soon he was snoozing. "Now's my chance," whispered the little red hen, and out she crept without a peck, peck, peck or a cluck, cluck, cluck. Quickly she rolled some large stones into the sack and tied a knot at the top. Then she ran all the way home and didn't stop till she was safe in her little red henhouse. The fox woke up and went on his way, hungry for his supper.

"This hen is heavy!" he said to himself, licking his lips.

"She'll make a good meal."

"Is the pot boiling, Mother?" he called at the den. "Look who I've got! It's the little red hen."

"Throw her in, son," said his mother.

"She'll make a nice snack."

So the sly fox opened up the sack. Into the boiling water crashed the stones with a SPLASH!

And that was the end of the sly fox and his mother. And the little red hen lived happily ever after in her little red henhouse, searching for grain with a peck, peck, peck and a cluck, cluck, cluck.


Jack and the Beanstalk

Based on a traditional folk tale
Retold by Iona Treahy

Once there was a boy called Jack who lived with his mother. They were so poor that she said to him one day, "We'll have to sell our cow- it's the only way."

So Jack took the cow to market. On the way, Jack met a stranger. "I'll give you five beans for that cow," she said. "They're magic beans…"

"Done!" said Jack. But when he got back…

"Five beans for our cow?" cried his mother. And she threw them out of the window. All through the night, a beanstalk grew…and grew… till it right out of sight. Before his mother could say a word, Jack climbed…and climbed…and he didn't stop till he reached…the top. There Jack saw a giant castle. He knock- knock- knocked, and a giantess opened the door.

Inside, Jack could hear a thumping and a banging and a stamping and a crashing!

"Quick," said the giantess. "Hide!" My husband is hungry!"

"Fee, fi, fo, fum! Watch out everyone, HERE I COME!" roared the giant.

The giant sat down for his supper. He ate a hundred boiled potatoes, and a hundred chocolate biscuits. And then, feeling a bit happier, he got out his gold.

The giant started counting his coins, but soon…he was snoozing. Jack snatched the gold and raced down the beanstalk.

"Gold!" cried Jack's mother when she saw what he'd got. "We're not poor any more!" But Jack wanted to go back up the beanstalk. The next day he climbed…and climbed… and he didn't stop till he reached the top. Inside the castle, Jack hid when he heard…a thumping and a banging and a stamping and a crashing. "Fee, fi, fo, fum! Watch out everyone, HERE I COME!" roared the giant. The giant sat down for his supper. He ate two hundred baked potatoes, and two hundred jellies. And then, feeling a bit happier, he got out his hen that laid golden eggs. The hen started laying, but soon…the giant was snoozing. Jack snatched the hen and raced down the beanstalk.

"Golden eggs from a golden hen!" cried Jack's mother.

"Now we'll never be poor again!" The next day, Jack climbed the beanstalk once more.

"Fee, fi, fo, fum! Watch out everyone, HERE I COME!" roared the giant.

The giant sat down for his supper. He ate three hundred roast potatoes, and three hundred cream cakes. And then, feeling a bit happier, he got out his silver harp.

The harp sang him lullabies, and soon… the giant was snoozing. Jack snatched the harp and raced down the beanstalk. But the harp called out, "Master! Master!"

The giant woke up and started to chase after Jack.

"Bring the axe, Mother!" shouted Jack as he neared the ground. Then he chopped and he chopped and didn't stop till…CRASH! Down came the beanstalk and the giant. And with the gold and the hard and the eggs and the hen, Jack and his mother were never poor again.


The Dog, the Cat, the Ass, and the Cock

USA

Once upon a time, a long while ago, when beasts and fowls could talk, it happened that a dog lived in a farmer's barnyard. By and by he grew tired of watching the house all night and working hard all day, so he thought he'd go out into the world to seek his fortune. One fine day, when the farmer had gone away, he started off down the road.

He hadn't gone far when he spied a cat curled up asleep on a door-stone in a farmer's yard, so he looked over the fence and called to the cat, "I'm going out into the world to seek my fortune. Don't you want to come along too?"

But the cat said she was very comfortable where she was, and didn't think she cared to go traveling. But the dog told her that by and by when she got old the farmer wouldn't let her lie on his sunny door-stone, but would make her lie in the cold, no matter whether it snowed or not. So the cat concluded she'd go along too, and they walked down the road arm in arm.

They hadn't gone far when they spied a jackass eating grass in a farmer's yard.

So the dog looked over the fence and called to the jackass, "We're going out into the world to seek our fortune. Don't you want to come along too?"

But the jackass said he was very comfortable where he was, and didn't think he cared to go traveling. But the dog told him that by and by, when he got old and stiff, he'd have to work early and late, year after year, for only just what he would eat, and short allowance at that. So the jackass concluded to go along too, and they all walked down the road arm in arm.

They hadn't gone far when they spied a cock crowing in a farmer's yard, so the dog looked over the fence and called, "We're going out into the world to seek our fortune. Don't you want to come along too?"

But the rooster said he was very comfortable where he was, and didn't think he cared to go traveling. But the dog told him that by and by, when it came Thanksgiving, pop would go his head, and he'd make a fine dinner for the farmer. So the rooster concluded he'd go along too, and they all walked down the road arm in arm.

Now they had neglected to take anything to eat along with them, and when night overtook them, weary, footsore, and hungry, they were in a dense forest, and they all began to blame the dog for getting them into such a scrape. The ass proposed that the cock should fly to the top of a high tree to see if he could discover a place for them to lodge. He had scarcely perched on a limb before he called to his friends that a house was a little way off, for he could see a light in the window. The dog called to him to come down and lead the was to the house, and they all walked off arm in arm to the house.

When they got there it was perfectly still about the house. They could hear no one inside. The ass kicked at the door, but no one answered. They looked about and found the house had only one window, and that was so high up they couldn't look in. He proposed that the jackass should stand on his hind legs, with his forelegs resting against the house, while the dog should clamber up his back and stand on his head, the cat run up the backs of both, and the rooster fly to the cat's head, and then he could just look in at the window.

"Hurry and tell what you see," said the jackass, "for my neck is breaking off."

"I see a fire on a hearth and a table loaded with all sorts of fine things to eat: turkey and plum pudding, and pan-dowdy, and a band of men sitting round the table."

"Zounds!" said the dog, "we must get in."

So the rooster flew against the window with such a crash that it scared the robbers — for this was a band of robbers -- nearly to death. They jumped up from the table so quickly that they overturned their chairs and whisked out the candles, while in flew the rooster, the cat, and the dog at the window, while the jackass went round and waited at the door till the robbers came out and ran away.

Then the beasts lighted the candles again, and picked up the chairs, and sat down and had a good supper. Then they began to look about to see how they should dispose of themselves for the night. The jackass went out in the barn to sleep in the hay, the dog lay on the rug by the hearth, the cat took up her bed among the warm ashes, and the rooster flew to the ridgepole of the house, and soon all were fast asleep, being very tired by their long day's journey.

By and by the robbers plucked up courage, and about midnight came back to the house to see if perchance they had not been scared at their shadows. Two of them got in at the window to take a survey, and seeing the cat's glowing eyes in the ashes mistook them for coals, and scratching a match in them the cat sunk her claws in his hand, which terrified him so much that in attempting to escape he ran against the dog, and he in turn caught the robber by the leg and bit him.

By this time the tumult had awakened the ass, and just as the robber rushed out at the door the jackass met him and kicked him ten feet in the air, while the rooster set up a hideous crowing. It took but a few minutes for the robbers to escape to the woods and find their companions, to whom they told a doleful tale, how in trying to light a match at the fireplace the devil with red-hot eyes stuck his claws into his hands, a second devil attacked him in the rear, while another devil kicked him into the air, and as he came down on the greensward, more dead than alive, another horrid demon form the housetop cried out, "Throw the rascal up her, through the rascal up here."

The thieves could never be induced to go back to the house. They thought it haunted by devils. So our friends, the jackass, the dog, the cat, and the rooster, lived there happy forever after, preferring it to traveling about to see the world.



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